What does CIA Stand for?

What does CIA Stand for

According to abbreviationfinder, CIA stands for Central Intelligence Agency.

Origin

The 26 of July of 1947 Harry S. Truman, President of the United States, signed the National Security Act which gave birth to the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). The Central Intelligence Agency or Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), heir to the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), which began to be organized by order of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, to combat Italy, Germany and Japan, during World War II, but it only began its functions in 1947, by means of the National Security Law number 153 of Congress and with the advent of the “ Cold War ”.

The CIA – with some 16,000 employees and headquarters located in a 104-hectare complex near the Potomac River in Langley, Virginia – was tasked with gathering and analyzing information regarding the foreign enemies of the United States (US) and thereby enabling the president, the Pentagon, and Congress to address present and potential threats.

Exercise

Although the legal framework establishes that the intelligence activity of the CIA must be ” timely, objective, independent of political considerations and based on the sources of the intelligence community, ” it is naive to accept that the US intelligence strategy In the real world, it is apolitical, since since its foundation, the CIA has exceeded its own limits and developed clandestine operations aimed at modifying the internal policies of other countries, depending on the interests and security of the United States.

Since its creation, the CIA has been involved in covert operations to destabilize governments and assassinate leaders in countries that have tried to carry out transformations in favor of their peoples and against North American interests.

The CIA is involved in the most murky policies, actions and maneuvers against leaders, organizations and institutions that interfere in the interests of the empire, violating all ethical, legal and diplomatic norms that govern international political and economic relations. In turn, a long history of corruption, illegal actions, denunciations and discredit are associated with this intelligence service and its main bosses.

Recent years

The appointment of billionaire Porter J. Goss to the CIA, who took office on April 25, 2005 as chief director, provoked skepticism from politicians and analysts, who expected a radical change in the leadership of that body. According to critics, Goss’s tenure as chairman of the House Intelligence Committee since 1996 was marked by his close relationship with former CIA director George Tenet.

Retired Admiral Stansfield Turner, director of the CIA under Jimmy Carter, considers Goss’s election to be ” the worst in the history of that position “; Meanwhile, Mel Goodman, a former analyst at the agency and specialist at the Center for International Policy, affirms that Goss has “all the inadequate credentials” for the position, including having been a secret agent for the CIA – Operations Directorate – in Latin America and Europe for nine years, in the 1960s.

Torture and illegal prisons

In 2006, international organizations accused the CIA of using European airports to transport prisoners to their prisons and of having multiple secret illegal prisons throughout Europe where they hold various people who are being tortured. Along the same lines, the tolerance or collaboration of various governments such as Hungary, Spain or [1] in these events has been denounced .

A report from the European Parliament confirmed in 2006 that the CIA has been ” directly responsible for the abduction, transfer, kidnapping and detention of terror suspects ” in Europe. The CIA, ” directly responsible ” for some illegal actions in Europe, says the european parliament

In the same year, following the revelation by President George Bush that secret CIA detention centers do exist for terror suspects, MEPs requested clarification of the possible involvement of European Union (EU) governments in the detention and transfer of prisoners by the CIA, as well as whether there were prisons of this type in community territory.

Finally, in 2007, Dick Marty, the Swiss senator investigating from the Council of Europe the illegal activities of the CIA after the attacks of the 11 S, issued its second report on the subject, in which it was assumed proven that Poland and Romania had housed illegal US intelligence agency detention centers between 2003 and 2005, where suspected Islamic terrorists were subjected to interrogation techniques “equivalent to torture.” Fernando Pescador (2007),

Numerous journalists and media around the world have made accusations against the US and, specifically, the CIA of violating the GenevaConventions by resorting to torture. [4]

In February 2009, the elected President of the United States, Barack Obama has named economist Leon Panetta as the new Acting Director of the CIA Director Agencia.Nuevo (February of 2009). Regarding those responsible for torture in the Panetta agency, he has stated that he will defend the officers who “did what their country asked them to do.”

What does CIA Stand for